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tanialee
bob mills for tanialee/anita carlson
Tue Jun 12, 2018 13:54
2607:fcc8:9d42:6200:d96b:16bc:491b:2e0d

Wow, you actually spoke with Hal, How interesting to me of course since I was one of his most avid fans. I can quite imagine that Hal might have grown weary of all the hullabaloo (remember that LK title?..never got to read that book but will try to sometime in the future) about his historical history.

At least you find the story in your words,"at a minimum intriguing" that's more than I'd expect from most people on this board. :)

You have valid questions about as to why Lindy identified the dead baby as Charlie Jr.and Anne's acceptance of that. I've often wondered if she put way too much trust in his judgment of things seeing as she gave Charles God-like status thereby accepting the dead baby scenario. Maybe that's why Anne at least didn't come forward saying, "That isn't my baby". I don't think we'll ever know truthfully.


Reeve Lindbergh was asked some questions pertaining to the kidnapping. WWD: Did your mother ever speak of the kidnapping?
R.L.: People have asked me to talk about the case but I know very little. I read Scott Bergís biography of my father. That was heavily researched. But I donít think my father ever spoke to me about it. My mother only talked about it in connection to my own grief. I know a friend of hers told me that she didnít believe it was intentional. She thought it was an accident. She was never a death penalty proponent. She was very distressed that [Bruno] Hauptmann was executed. She felt there had been enough death. But she didnít talk about it with me.

WWD: Many people would consider the kidnapping to be one of the definitive moments in your motherís life. What do you think she would consider the definitive moment to be?
R.L.: Marrying my father. She met him in Mexico City when she had come home for Christmas from Smith [College.] Her father was the ambassador to Mexico and Charles Lindbergh had flown there on a goodwill trip after his famous flight. [Dwight Morrow had also been a partner at J.P. Morgan and he was later a U.S. senator.] In her diary at that time, she recalled, ďHe is taller than anyone else ó you see his head in a moving crowd and you notice his glance, where it turns, as though it were keener, clearer, and brighter than anyone elseís, lit with a more intense fire.ÖWhat could I say to this boy? Anything I might say would be trivial and superficial, like pink frosting flowers.Ē

WWD: Did anything strike you about the way she wrote?
R.L.: Early on [in her writings] it was odd to see how she was more reticent and self-deprecating. She told me once how he was the knight and she was the page. But through this book, you see how she became a more liberated woman, though I donít know that word applies to her. She was bigger than that.

WWD: What would people be surprised to learn about your father?
R.L.: Many have been surprised to learn my father had other children through relationships outside my parentsí marriage. People whom we have now met and know in Europe. [Charles Lindbergh was believed to have fathered seven other children with three women other than the six he had with his wife.]

WWD: What would most surprise people about your mother?
R.L.: Her strength would be surprising and her ability to understand him. She was quite tolerant about his needing his own space and his own life. She wanted him to feel free, which was fairly sophisticated for that time. But I donít know that she thought that meant to go out and have three secret families.

WWD: Do you think your mother was aware of your fatherís other relationships?
R.L.: I donít think so. Someone once told me she knew something but she didnít know what she knew. She didnít know what or where but she may have chosen not to.

WWD: One of your motherís 14 books, ďA Gift From the Sea,Ē has sold more than three million copies and is available in 45 languages. What made her write about the role of women in the 20th century while vacationing on Captiva Island in 1955?
R.L.: I think she felt that she had to write it. I donít think she knew how important it was over time. The book is very short but you find something new to it every time you read it. She was very perceptive about her own thoughts and feelings and experiences, and those of other people. That talent or gift for her had to be expressed or reported. She used to say she didnít think anything was real until she wrote it on paper.

WWD: Did your mother have any hidden talents?
R.L.: She painted very well and was a sculptor. When my father was consulting with Henry Ford [on B-24 bomber planes], my mother studied art at Cranbrook. She was also a glider pilot. She was the first woman in America to be one [in 1930]. She absolutely loved it. She said it was more fun than flying in airplanes. As part of the war effort, my father was always involved with aircraft design and throughout his life. He worked with Pan Am at one point, too.

WWD: What do you hope readers will glean from this book?
R.L.: I think recent widows will be comforted. There is a long section on widowhood and how you progress. And people who are going crazy with children might be amused by some of her stories. Some might be interested in her response to the Kennedy assassination. Obviously she was devastated by it. Everyone was devastated. There are several sections about getting older and how we respond to our [own] aging. She had always wanted to write a book about that, so I guess this is it.

WWD: Some people carry around advice their parents gave them. Is that the case with you?
R.L.: I quite often think of my mother, of her openness about life as it progresses. She was always open and flexible. She believed in not being afraid to live for the whole of your life. She is very much with me.

WWD: Did your mother ever speak of the kidnapping?
R.L.: People have asked me to talk about the case but I know very little. I read Scott Bergís biography of my father. That was heavily researched. But I donít think my father ever spoke to me about it. My mother only talked about it in connection to my own grief. I know a friend of hers told me that she didnít believe it was intentional. She thought it was an accident. She was never a death penalty proponent. She was very distressed that [Bruno] Hauptmann was executed. She felt there had been enough death. But she didnít talk about it with me.

WWD: Many people would consider the kidnapping to be one of the definitive moments in your motherís life. What do you think she would consider the definitive moment to be?
R.L.: Marrying my father. She met him in Mexico City when she had come home for Christmas from Smith [College.] Her father was the ambassador to Mexico and Charles Lindbergh had flown there on a goodwill trip after his famous flight. [Dwight Morrow had also been a partner at J.P. Morgan and he was later a U.S. senator.] In her diary at that time, she recalled, ďHe is taller than anyone else ó you see his head in a moving crowd and you notice his glance, where it turns, as though it were keener, clearer, and brighter than anyone elseís, lit with a more intense fire.ÖWhat could I say to this boy? Anything I might say would be trivial and superficial, like pink frosting flowers.Ē

WWD: Did anything strike you about the way she wrote?
R.L.: Early on [in her writings] it was odd to see how she was more reticent and self-deprecating. She told me once how he was the knight and she was the page. But through this book, you see how she became a more liberated woman, though I donít know that word applies to her. She was bigger than that.

WWD: What would people be surprised to learn about your father?
R.L.: Many have been surprised to learn my father had other children through relationships outside my parentsí marriage. People whom we have now met and know in Europe. [Charles Lindbergh was believed to have fathered seven other children with three women other than the six he had with his wife.]

WWD: What would most surprise people about your mother?
R.L.: Her strength would be surprising and her ability to understand him. She was quite tolerant about his needing his own space and his own life. She wanted him to feel free, which was fairly sophisticated for that time. But I donít know that she thought that meant to go out and have three secret families.

WWD: Do you think your mother was aware of your fatherís other relationships?
R.L.: I donít think so. Someone once told me she knew something but she didnít know what she knew. She didnít know what or where but she may have chosen not to.

WWD: One of your motherís 14 books, ďA Gift From the Sea,Ē has sold more than three million copies and is available in 45 languages. What made her write about the role of women in the 20th century while vacationing on Captiva Island in 1955?
R.L.: I think she felt that she had to write it. I donít think she knew how important it was over time. The book is very short but you find something new to it every time you read it. She was very perceptive about her own thoughts and feelings and experiences, and those of other people. That talent or gift for her had to be expressed or reported. She used to say she didnít think anything was real until she wrote it on paper.

WWD: Did your mother have any hidden talents?
R.L.: She painted very well and was a sculptor. When my father was consulting with Henry Ford [on B-24 bomber planes], my mother studied art at Cranbrook. She was also a glider pilot. She was the first woman in America to be one [in 1930]. She absolutely loved it. She said it was more fun than flying in airplanes. As part of the war effort, my father was always involved with aircraft design and throughout his life. He worked with Pan Am at one point, too.

WWD: What do you hope readers will glean from this book?
R.L.: I think recent widows will be comforted. There is a long section on widowhood and how you progress. And people who are going crazy with children might be amused by some of her stories. Some might be interested in her response to the Kennedy assassination. Obviously she was devastated by it. Everyone was devastated. There are several sections about getting older and how we respond to our [own] aging. She had always wanted to write a book about that, so I guess this is it.

WWD: Some people carry around advice their parents gave them. Is that the case with you?
R.L.: I quite often think of my mother, of her openness about life as it progresses. She was always open and flexible. She believed in not being afraid to live for the whole of your life. She is very much with me.












  • anita carlsonbob mills for tanialee, Tue Jun 12 10:03
    Don't know about Anita Carlson, Tanialee. I spoke with Hal Olson on the phone only once, and he never mentioned her and I never asked him about her. He was pleasant, but my recollection is that he... more
    • bob mills for tanialee/anita carlson — tanialee, Tue Jun 12 13:54
      • Reeve interviewRichard E Sloan, Wed Jun 13 11:46
        Maybe I missed it, Bob, but I'd like to know who is the "WWD" who had this good interview with Reeve Lindbergh, and when and under what circs. it was conducted. I met and briefly chatted with her a... more
        • Marian ChristyRichard Sloan, Wed Jun 27 13:46
          SOmeone here (Sue?) posted something about Marian Christy, a reporter working for the Boston Globe (she retired around 1995). In 1982 she conducted an interview with Anna Hauptmann in PA. Does anyone ... more
        • WWD the interviewerbob mills for richard sloan, Wed Jun 13 11:55
          I don't know who or what WWD is either, Richard. Maybe Tanialee can educate us.
      • reevebob mills for tanialee, Tue Jun 12 16:14
        Reeve was very much under the control of her older brothers where the family's past issues were concerned (including the kidnapping). Jon and Land in particular; I don't think Scott has much to do... more
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