Toby Charles Anderson
re: Jericho
Wed Jun 13, 2018 15:51
173.25.33.79

Hello Anonymous,

After giving the link to a page in a book, you concluded.

You wrote:
"The scarabs come from an administrative palace built later. But there was no city there."

That is NOT what your reference states. I quote the book below to show your mis-representation of it. In fact, it doesn't state where the scarabs were found.

On the other hand, Bryand Wood PHD, archeologist, who has been to and studied the Jericho site states:

"Garstang concluded that City IV came to an end about 1400 B.C.E., based on pottery found in the destruction debris, on scarabs recovered from nearby tombs"
---- http://www.biblearchaeology.org/post/2008/05/Did-the-Israelites-Conquer-Jericho-A-New-Look-at-the-Archaeological-Evidence.aspx

"....scarabs recovered from nearby tombs"

Similary, the following states the scarabs were found in the Necropolis (graveyard), some 250 yards from the Jericho mound:

"Another important find was a necropolis 250 yards to the west of the city mound, which yielded artifacts as well as information on burial customs. The tombs were either small grotto-like chambers or shallow, round graves. They contained pottery and other offerings, which could be used for rough dating, and in some cases to establish ties to Egypt and Babylonia. From the pottery and scarabs found at the necropolis, Garstang concluded that its use was continuous from the third millennium BCE until the city's final destruction around 1400 BCE. "
--- http://facultysites.vassar.edu/jolott/old_courses/class%20of%2051/jericho/garstang.html

Methinks that this is great evidence by itself, that the city was occupied until 1400bc. The land inside the city walls was 'precious' because of all the labor to build the walls. It is reasonable that the graveyard would be close to but outside the city walls.

But there is further evidence. There was local pottery in the graveyard (as opposed to the foreign cypriot expensive pottery found in the latter build palace (approix. 1300's bc)). This local graveyard pottery matched pottery found within Jericho itself.

Here is the pertinent part of the page you referenced:

"The main disagreement comes from dating: according to John Garstange, the destruction of Jericho took place around -1400 (bc), but according to Kathleen Kenyon, the city was destroyed around -1500 and was then abandoned. Dating the destruction of Jericho is tricky because teh remains of the city are very small and it has been rebuilt at least 7 times. Fortunately the only layer where there was destruction by fire is dated around -1550. The discovery of scarab seals in the name of Thutmose III, Hatshepsut and Amenhotep III, provers tha this city was still inhabited long after this date (Fn 162). "

In particular:

---"The discovery of scarab seals in the name of Thutmose III, Hatshepsut and Amenhotep III, provers tha this city was still inhabited long after this date (Fn 162). "---

Note, it does NOT state where the scarabs were found.

Toby

  • re: JerichoAnonymous, Tue Jun 12 00:40
    https://books.google.com/books?id=c_tDCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA91&lpg=PA91&dq=Garstang+middle+building+scarabs&source=bl&ots=F5x6Pfzd5-&sig=RUYOjjihQeYfoqYyAa3bacSZeVQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwju__jfs83bAhWs64MKHbv... more
    • re: Jericho — Toby Charles Anderson, Wed Jun 13 15:51
      • re: JerichoAnonymous, Fri Jun 15 09:49
        Toby: My trivial mistake, already conceeded, changes nothing. The necropolis is a separate site from the city. A curse was put on rebuilding the city, but not on continued use of the necropolis. So... more
    • re: JerichoAnonymous, Tue Jun 12 15:50
      Pardon my error. The scarabs came from the Necropolis, which is not the city. //From the pottery and scarabs found at the necropolis, Garstang concluded that its use was continuous from the third... more
    • re: JerichoMarianne Luban, Tue Jun 12 11:43
      Anonymous wrote: "The scarabs come from an administrative palace built later. But there was no city there." I am of the opinion that "Anonymous" is nothing more than a trolling sock-puppet, who... more
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