Cullom
But, as usual -- disagreement in antiquity
Sat Feb 23, 2008 08:51
24.162.196.33 (XFF: 81.106.124.212)

Hello Marianne,
I should have said that Thutmosis I was succeeded by a "son-in-law" since his son Thutmosis II married his daughter Hatshepsut.
The story of Abisha is remarkably similar to the story of Abram. Abram entered Egypt and was met by a high official who took him to the king. After Abraham had been in Egypt for a while a plague struck the land, inspiring the king to expel him from Egypt with a load of gifts.
Abisha also met with Khnumhotep, the nomarch, and was taken to king Senusret. Sometime after that during the reign of Senusret III, the city of Kahun was abandoned almost intact.
It has been called the Pompeii of Egypt. Many of the texts found there relate to veterinary practices, which may mean that a plague on livestock occurred and caused the city to be abandoned.
If the chronology of the Old Testament is acceptable, Abraham would have flourished during the time of Senusret III.
In your earlier post you related that Egypt was ruled by Palmanothes AND Chenephres so Chenephres must have been more than an important official. I find no royal names in the 18th dynasty that can be hellenized or latinized into those names.
More later,
Cullom

  • Re: But, as usual -- disagreement in antiquityMarianne Luban, Fri Feb 22 02:13
    Oops--pressed some wrong button. Hatshepsut, her Speos Artemidos inscription, says the "Aamu" were ensconced at Avaris "with vagabonds among them". Now, the Aamu were realistically depicted in a tomb ... more
    • But, as usual -- disagreement in antiquity — Cullom, Sat Feb 23 08:51
      • But, as usual -- disagreement in antiquityMarianne Luban, Sat Feb 23 15:55
        Cullom: In your earlier post you related that Egypt was ruled by Palmanothes AND Chenephres so Chenephres must have been more than an important official. ML: Why? He can have been a local lord.... more
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