shadow
"If there was nothing, there Mueller would have already said
Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:59pm
24.205.112.78

so?" You believe that. Maybe you need to brush up on the ACTUAL facts:

THE LEFT UNHINGED
That other plot – to bring down Trump


Well over a year after the FBI began investigating “collusion” between the Trump campaign and Vladimir Putin, Special Counsel Robert Mueller has brought in his first major indictment.

Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort has been charged with a series of crimes dating back years, though none is tied directly to President Donald Trump or 2016.

With a leak to CNN that indictments were coming, Mueller’s office stole the weekend headlines. This blanketed the explosive news on a separate front, as the dots began to be connected on a bipartisan plot to bring down Trump that began two years ago.

And like “Murder of the Orient Express,” it seems almost everyone on the train had a hand in the plot.

The narrative begins in October 2015.

Then it was that the Washington Free Beacon, a neocon website, engaged a firm of researchers called Fusion GPS to do deep dirt-diving into Trump’s personal and professional life – and take him out.

A spinoff of Bill Kristol’s The Weekly Standard, the Beacon is run by his son-in-law. And its Daddy Warbucks is the GOP oligarch and hedge-fund billionaire Paul Singer.

From October 2015 to May 2016, Fusion GPS dug up dirt for the neocons and never-Trumpers. By May, however, Trump had routed all rivals and was the certain Republican nominee.

So the Beacon bailed, and Fusion GPS found two new cash cows to finance its dirt-diving – the DNC and the Clinton campaign.

To keep the sordid business at arm’s length, both engaged the party’s law firm of Perkins Coie. Paid $12.4 million by the DNC and Clinton campaign, Perkins used part of this cash hoard to pay Fusion GPS.

Here is where it begins to get interesting.

In June 2016, Fusion GPS engaged a British spy, Christopher Steele, who had headed up the Russia desk at MI6, to ferret out any connections between Trump and Russia.

Steele began contacting old acquaintances in the FSB, the Russian intelligence service. And the Russians began to feed him astonishing dirt on Trump that could, if substantiated, kill his candidacy.

Among the allegations was that Trump had consorted with prostitutes at a Moscow hotel, that the Kremlin was blackmailing him, that there was provable collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

In memos from June to October 2016, Steele passed this on to Fusion GPS, which passed it on to major U.S. newspapers. But as the press was unable to verify it, they declined to publish it.

Steele’s final product, a 35-page dossier, has been described as full of “unsubstantiated and salacious allegations.”

Steele’s research, however, had also made its way to James Comey’s FBI, which was apparently so taken with it that the bureau considered paying Steele to continue his work.

About this “astonishing” development, columnist Byron York of the Washington Examiner quotes Sen. Chuck Grassley:

“The idea that the FBI and associates of the Clinton campaign would pay Mr. Steele to investigate the Republican nominee for president in the run-up to the election raises … questions about the FBI’s independence from politics, as well as the Obama administration’s use of law enforcement and intelligence agencies for political ends.”

The questions begin to pile up.

What was the FBI’s relationship with the British spy who was so wired into Russian intelligence?

Did the FBI use the information Steele dug up to expand its own investigation of Russia-Trump “collusion”? Did the FBI pass what Steele unearthed to the White House and the National Security Council?

Did the Obama administration use the information from the Steele dossier to justify unmasking the names of Trump officials who had been picked up on legitimate electronic intercepts?

In testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Clinton campaign chair John Podesta and DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz claimed they did not know that Perkins Coie had enlisted Fusion GPA or the British spy to dig up dirt on Trump.

Yet, when Podesta testified, the lawyer sitting beside him in the committee room was Marc Elias of Perkins Coie, who had engaged Fusion GPS and received the fruits of Steele’s undercover work.

Here one is tempted to cite Bismarck that, if you wish to enjoy politics or sausages, you should not inquire too closely how they are made.

Thus we have Free Beacon neocons, never-Trump Republicans, the Hillary Clinton campaign, the DNC, a British spy and comrades in Russian intelligence, and perhaps the FBI, all working with secret money and seedy individuals to destroy a candidate they could not defeat in a free election.

If future revelations demonstrate that this is what went down, it is not only the White House that has major problems.

If you wish to know why Americans detest politics and hate the “swamp” that has been made of their capital city, follow this story all the way to its inevitable end. It will be months of unfolding.

The real indictment here is of the American political system, and the true tragedy is the decline of the Old Republic.

by Patrick Buchanan

WND.com.

  • You're The One Having The Meltdown...Amadeus, Tue Oct 31 2:49pm
    I wouldn't be calling anyone else "snowflake" just now. If there was nothing there, Mueller would have already said so. You apparently do not understand the concept of opposition research. There is... more
    • ..."opposition research" is illegal. And that's what the DNC and the Hillary campaign did. They also intentionally tried to mask the financing. Also illegal. So, back to the real story here. The DNC... more
      • Bzzzzt...Amadeus, Tue Oct 31 5:09pm
        Fusion isn't an agent of another country. Where did you get that idea? Amadeus
        • Even if they wereJeeves, Tue Oct 31 6:17pm
          Arguably, a foreign agent was employed since Christopher Steele is a British citizen, and indirectly paid by the Clinton campaign. However, I don't know of any statutes which make it illegal for a... more
          • OTOHPikes, Tue Oct 31 7:02pm
            How many years did the Tres Gaudie Republicans spend "inventigating" Clinton? Their net results?
      • I believe that you are mistakenJeeves, Tue Oct 31 5:07pm
        " Paying agents of another country for the results of 'opposition research' is illegal. " You keep claiming that, but, AFAIK, the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) prohibits any foreign national... more
    • "If there was nothing, there Mueller would have already said — shadow, Tue Oct 31 2:59pm
      • I Responded To This On The Other Board...Amadeus, Tue Oct 31 5:10pm
        Your piece isn't quite correct in the details. *shrug* Reality is coming. Amadeus
      • as Donald Trump. This is the beginning of the beginning. Not end of the beginning, or beginning of the end. There is a great deal of speculation. I speculated too, and it may be wrong, or partially... more
      • Friday - "Oooooh yeah. Here we go. They've indicted someone. THIS is gonna be GOOOOOOOD." The indictment is released. Nothing. Nothing in any way connected to Trump, the Trump campaign, Russia,... more
        • Have You NOT Been Paying Attention?Amadeus, Tue Oct 31 5:13pm
          Seriously? The indictments are leverage. Papadopoulos is the real story. And the details are so important. There are more indictments already in the works. Patience. Mueller is very, very good at his ... more
          • he's literally parroting the Trump criminal enterprise talking points word for word. That is ALL he is paying attention to.
            • InventigationPikes, Wed Nov 1 4:14am
              That's their investigation. Absent facts, they invent their own and pass them like Gospel. Like social disease in the clubs Trump owns and frequents.