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Bob Goodwin
Robbers Roost in 1899
Sat Feb 3, 2018 7:24am
73.228.72.237

In spite of Dan's humorous reply, Robbers Roost in 1899 was about as Pocock described it; whether he was actually there or got his information second hand.

The Roost by the fall or late summer of 1899 was pretty much abandoned. They only ones left in the area were a few hanger on's. left overs from the Roosts glory days of 1895 through 1898. Most had been driven out of the area by Joe Bush, and his various citizen posses. Jack Moore whom you could say was the ruler of the Roost, was dead, shot in the fall of 1898 near Baggs, Wyoming trying to steal horses. Butch and Elzy were long gone to New Mexico, Tom McCarty, who had been in the area before the Delta Bank Robbery was cooling his heels in the Wallowa valley of Oregon, pretending to be a good citizen, though he was rumored to be hiding in the Henry Mountains somewhere. Matt Warner was cooling his heels in the Utah State Prison. Gunplay Maxwell was in with Warner behind bars in Sugarhouse. Blue John and Indian Ed Newcomb had both fled the region after the battle of the Roost in early 1899, Silver Tip Jim Howells, Blue John's and Indian Ed's partner was in the Sevier County jail, Monte Butler, who was Jack Moore's good friend, had packed up his wife and belongings and went back to Manco's Colorado. Lew McCarty who was considered part of the gangs, and for whom Governor Well's had a $200 reward out for, was living as a good citizen around Monticello or Moab. Lastly J.B. Buhr, the owner of the 3B outfit and the Robbers Roost ranch had given up any idea of ranching was rounding up whatever stock he could and with Jack Moore's, widow were packing up to leave the area for Texas.

After the Wilcox Robbery, Harvey Logan and Harry Longabaugh were trailed through the area by Charlie Siringo, just before Pocock wandered in. As you mentioned, they were sometimes called the Roberts brothers. No wonder, when Pocock reached Monticello, he was viewed with suspicion. Siringo had stirred up the whole countryside.

By the fall of 1899 the Roost was mostly abandoned.

  • Re: The two girls at Robbers RoostVince Garcia, Fri Feb 2 12:25pm
    My main interest is the two girls. Assuming he heard the story from locals (who may have had semi-accurate info), he may be pinning down where they may have come from, which is valuable knowledge for ... more
    • The Women of Robbers RoostBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 8:36am
      Vince, There are four, possibly six women (girls) that were associated with Robbers Roost. Two Women (girls) from Castle Valley were mentioned as being at the Roost early in 1897, and are the ones... more
      • Re: The Women of Robbers RoostDaniel Buck, Sat Feb 3 9:25am
        Bob, Thanks. Both your posts this morning are excellent. Do you know any of the women you mentioned were either in the newspapers or known in, say, Monticello, at the time Pocock was coming through?... more
        • re: the Women of Robbers RoostBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 11:43am
          Dan, Ella Butler had left the Roost area around the time of the Springville Bank Robbery. In later life she used the name Florence in California where she was living after 1920. In 1898 Mont Butler,... more
        • re: the Women of Robbers RoostBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 11:17am
          Dan, Ella Butler had left the Roost area around the time of the Springville Bank Robbery. In later life she used the name Florence in California where she was living after 1920. In 1898 Mont Butler,... more
          • re: the Women of Robbers RoostDaniel Buck, Sat Feb 3 12:02pm
            Bob, Thanks. Much appreciated. Your several posts are granular in the best sense of the word. Pocock, p. 289, blends two sets of women into one compound sentence: "The house is cheered by the... more
    • Robbers Roost in 1899 — Bob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 7:24am
    • Re: The two girls at Robbers RoostDaniel Buck, Fri Feb 2 12:48pm
      Vince, here's a question, when we say -- or Pocock says -- Robbers Roost, what are we really talking about. How big an area, smallest to largest estimates? Second, could he not have wandered into the ... more
      • Re: The two girls at Robbers RoostVince Garcia, Fri Feb 2 2:15pm
        That may be true. In fact, he may never have gone further than camp out at the Flattops. What's important to me is the lore about the two girls' place of origin he may have gotten from locals,... more
        • The FlattopsBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 6:44am
          Vince, The Flattops are a good fifteen miles north of the Roost in the middle of the San Rafael Desert. To get there from Monticello would mean taking the northern route to Green River and back down. ... more
        • Re: The two girls at Robbers RoostDaniel Buck, Sat Feb 3 5:06am
          Vince, Read Pocock's Following the Frontier (1903), "The Trail of the Outlaw," but only if you are a glutton for confusion. The chief moment of clarity is p. 287, where he says that he arrived in... more
          • The trail to Robbers RoostBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 6:39am
            Here is the full quote from page 289 (Roger Pocock "Following the Frontier, 1903:" "The tract of land on top of the Orange Cliffs, entirely surrounded by canyons, can only be reached by one or two... more
            • Southwest Coloradojim lynch, Sat Feb 3 11:28am
              For anyone with an interest in that part of Colorado, starting in Grand Junction head east on hi-way 50 towards Delta. Turn south on 141 towards Whitewater and cross the Dolores River. Follow the... more
              • Unaweep CanyonBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 11:38am
                Jim, Unaweep is the route that Pocock took South from Grand Junction following roughly the course of route 141.
              • re: Southwest ColoradoBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 11:34am
                If you actually take the time to travel down there, don't forget to stop at Dove Creek for some Anasazi beans. Low on gas, and very tasty. Dove Creek is the Bean capital of the U.S.
                • re: Southwest Coloradojim lynch, Sat Feb 3 12:34pm
                  I was raised in Cortez and mined uranium on Long Park near Naturita. This is pretty close to heaven!
            • Re: The trail to Robbers RoostDaniel Buck, Sat Feb 3 6:59am
              Bob, I'm not familiar with the area, that is a given. But I have read (and, alas, reread, Pocock). In the chapter from Following the Frontier (1903) under discussion, "The Trail of the Outlaw," he... more
              • re: the trailBob Goodwin, Sat Feb 3 7:42am
                Dan, Your clarity and alacrity are always astounding. Yes, you are correct, Pocock never in his narratives says that he actually visited the Roost himself. And, as you have mentioned often, in his... more
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