Lease this WebApp and get rid of the ads.
Professor Nathan Xavier
Intermediates: It’s a Bee Eating Plant!
Tue Sep 11, 2018 14:33
167.219.0.176

Nathan stood just inside the door of Greenhouse One as the intermediates arrived. He handed back their homework essays with a personalized comment for each student based on their work. Some remarks were as simple as ‘good job’ while others highlighted interesting points or observations the student had made. Occasionally, he reminded a student that he had office hours all day on Wednesdays and they could stop in any time if they were having trouble, but the necessity for that was fortunately slim. Overall, they had done pretty well writing about the flutterby bush.

“Welcome back,” he greeted once everyone had arrived and taken seats. Intermediates were his last class of the day, and he suspected that by the 3:30 start time, many of them were ready to be done for the day. Nathan found himself sympathizing today. It was a Thursday, and since he didn’t teach on Fridays, this was effectively his last lesson before the weekend.


“Continuing on with our unit of semi-dangerous carnivorous plants,” Nathan began, “we’re going to look at the Beebane plant today, which belongs to the sundew family. Unlike the Flutterby bush, which only flowers once a century, but aims for larger prey, Beebane plants have flowers that bloom most of the year. However, as the name implies, they aren’t looking to eat wizards. They capture insects as they try to pollinate the flowers and eat them.”

“What makes this a magical plant is that the flowers are not botanical flowers; they are purely illusionary and used as a lure and disguise for the plant’s mouth. It will make small flowers for a single day each year that are actual real reproductive flowers, but most of the time, their ‘flowers’ are purely a hunting mechanism. Once an insect lands on it, the flower vanishes, revealing a brightly colored stem with sticky tendrils that hold the insect in place as it is slowly consumed.”

“Still,” he continued, “wizards do need to be careful and should wear gloves while handling a Beebane plant. Those tendrils will attack anything that gets too close to the flowers and they can make your fingers numb. For that reason, those tendrils are harvested and used in several anesthetic potions, as well as several that aid deception.”

Nathan gestured toward the back of the greenhouse where a rack of three shelves held enough potted flowering plants for everyone to get one, “Which is precisely what we will be doing today. Make sure you take notes and observations about the flowers before you touch them, and about the tendrils and mouth stem after you do. Also collect a glass vial from my desk to put your harvested tendrils into. Cut them as close to the mouth as you can without getting any of the stem itself. They will grow back in about a week if the stem is left intact.”


OOC: I made up the Beebane plant. The flowers are magic illusions and can mimic any other kind of flower, though each individual plant
probably just produces one kind of flower. Tendrils based on the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosera_capensis . Feel free to make up additional details. Have fun! You know the drill by now.

Click here to receive daily updates