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Scroll Trench Storage
Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:29
76.184.189.94

Scroll Trench Storage

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/ba/ba.html
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56014552
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Scroll_Trench
http://www.eternalidol.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Scroll-Trench.1.jpg

[[image:Stonehenge Heelstone.jpg|right|thumb|250px|Southwest face of Heelstone]]

The '''Heelstone''' is a single large block of [[sarsen]] stone standing within the [[Avenue (archaeology)|Avenue]] outside the entrance of the [[Stonehenge]] earthwork, close to the main road ([[Highways Agency]] A344). Sarsen stone is an [[Oligocene]]-[[Miocene]] silicified [[sandstone]], found as scattered blocks resting on the [[Chalk]] of southern [[England]]. In section it is sub-rectangular, with a minimum thickness of 8 ft (2.4m), rising to a tapered top about 16 ft (4.7m) high. [[Excavation (archaeology)|Excavation]] has shown that a further 4 ft (1.2m) is buried in the ground.

Heelstone is an eroded [[Column|pillar]] 254 ft (77.4m) from the center of Stonehenge circle. It leans towards the Southwest (pictured view) nearly 27 degrees from the [[Vertical direction|vertical]]. The stone has an overall [[girth]] of 25 ft (7.6m) and weighs about 35 tons. Some 12 ft (3.7m) from its base is a narrow, roughly circular feature called [[Heelstone Ditch]], 4 ft (1.2m) deep and 3.5 ft (1.1m) wide. A large [[Scroll Trench|Arc Trench]] found in 1923 by [[William Hawley|Lt-Col William Hawley]] 9 ft (2.7m) wide cuts this [[ditch]] from the West, deepening towards the stone.

[[Mythology|Myths]] and legends of the [[Devil]] striking a "Friar's Heel" with a stone resulted in its eccentric name, ''Heel Stone''. Some claim "Friar's Heel" is a corruption of "Freyja's He-ol" or "Freyja Sul", from the [[Continental Germanic mythology|Nordic]] goddess [[Freyja]] and (allegedly) the [[Wales|Welsh]] words for "way" and "Sunday" respectively. It is doubtful whether any [[Prehistory|prehistoric]] standing stone has experienced as many name changes and interpretations. Only in the past three decades have world [[scientist]]s used the name Heelstone consistently.

==Source==
* [[Richard J. C. Atkinson|Atkinson]], R J C, ''Stonehenge'' (Penguin Books, 1956)
* Cleal, Walker, & Montague, ''Stonehenge in its Landscape'' (London, English Heritage 1995)
* Cunliffe, B, & Renfrew, C, ''Science and Stonehenge'' (The British Academy 92, Oxford University Press 1997)
* [[William Hawley|Hawley, Lt-Col W]], ''Report on the Excavations at Stonehenge during the season of 1923'' (The Antiquaries Journal 5, Oxford University Press, 1925)

==Further reading==
* Newall, R S, ''Stonehenge, Wiltshire (Ancient monuments and historic buildings)'' (Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1959)
* Pitts, M, ''Hengeworld'' (Arrow, London, 2001)
* Pitts, M W, ''On the Road to Stonehenge: Report on Investigations beside the A344 in 1968, 1979 and 1980'' (Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 48, 1982)
* [[J. F. S. Stone|Stone, J F S]], ''Wessex Before the Celts'' (Frederick A Praeger Publishers, 1958)

[[Category:Stonehenge]]

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/ba/ba.html
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56014552
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Scroll_Trench
http://www.eternalidol.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Scroll-Trench.1.jpg

[[image:Stonehenge Heelstone.jpg|right|thumb|200px|Heelstone Ditch (circular depression)]]

'''Heelstone Ditch''' is a roughly circular [[Earthworks (archaeology)|earthwork]] having steep sloping sides which end at a narrow flat base, being approximately 4 ft (1.2m) deep and 3.5 ft (1.1m) wide. It is located in [[England]] at [[Stonehenge]] around its outermost [[sarsen]], the [[Heelstone]] (Stonehole 96). The [[ditch]] was cut into [[Late Cretaceous]] ([[Santonian]] Age) Seaford [[Chalk]], the formation which geologically crops out at Stonehenge. It is some 12 ft (3.7m) from Heelstone's base, having a diameter of roughly 32 ft (9.7m). A broad [[Arc (geometry)|arcing]] [[trench]] found in 1923 by [[William Hawley|Lt-Col William Hawley]] 9 ft (2.7m) wide cuts this ditch from the West, deepening towards the stone. Against the Heelstone Ditch (inside circle) is rammed chalk filled Stonehole 97, whose missing stone is known as Heelstone's twin. [[Stratigraphy|Stratigraphic]] sequence of these features, from earliest to latest, runs (southern) [[Avenue (archaeology)|Avenue]] Bank - Heelstone Ditch - Stonehole 97 - [[Scroll Trench]].

[[Mississippian (geologic period)|Early Carboniferous]] ([[Arundian]] Age) High Tor [[Limestone]] [[Fossil|fossils]] identified from the lower-half fill of Heelstone Ditch include ''Aclisina, Aviculopecten, Bellerophon, Caninia cornucopiae, Chondrites, Cleiothyridina roissyi, Composita, Conocardium, Delepinea (Daviesiella) destinezi, Euphemites, Girvanella, Hapsiphyllum (Zaphrentis) konincki, Linoproductus, Megachonetes papilionaceous, Michelina grandis, Mourlonia, Murchisonia, Palaeosmilia, Plicochonetes, Rhipidomella michelini, Schellwienella'' cf. ''S. crenistria, Straparollus, Syringopora,'' and ''[[Zoophycos]]''. The upper-half fill is silted-in [[periglacial]] [[Cryoturbation|cryoturbated]] Seaford Chalk. Only a small part of Heelstone Ditch, immediately behind the [[Highways Agency]] A344 roadside fence, now remains unexplored or undisturbed. General nature of the ditch and fill described in 1979 by Michael W. Pitts, ''et al.'' [http://www.britarch.ac.uk/ba/ba.html], compares well with Hawley's (1923, 1925).

==Source==
* [[Richard J. C. Atkinson|Atkinson]], R J C, ''Stonehenge'' (Penguin Books, 1956)
* Cleal, Walker, & Montague, ''Stonehenge in its Landscape'' (London, English Heritage 1995)
* Pitts, M W, ''On the Road to Stonehenge: Report on Investigations beside the A344 in 1968, 1979 and 1980'' (Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 48, 1982)
* [[William Hawley|Hawley, Lt-Col W]], ''Report on the Excavations at Stonehenge during the season of 1923'' (The Antiquaries Journal 5, Oxford University Press, 1925)

==Further reading==
* Cunliffe, B, & Renfrew, C, ''Science and Stonehenge'' (The British Academy 92, Oxford University Press 1997)
* Newall, R S, ''Stonehenge, Wiltshire (Ancient monuments and historic buildings)'' (Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1959)
* Pitts, M, ''Hengeworld'' (Arrow, London, 2001)
* [[J. F. S. Stone|Stone, J F S]], ''Wessex Before the Celts'' (Frederick A Praeger Publishers, 1958)

[[Category:Stonehenge]]

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/ba/ba.html
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56014552
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Scroll_Trench
http://www.eternalidol.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Scroll-Trench.1.jpg

[[image:Scroll Trench, Stonehenge.jpg|right|thumb|150px|Scroll Trench, Stonehenge]]

'''Scroll Trench''', also called [[Arc (geometry)|Arc]] [[Trench]], is a 25 ft (7.6m) long by 9 ft (2.7m) wide curved cutting into the [[Late Cretaceous]] ([[Santonian]] Age) Seaford [[Chalk]] formation at [[Stonehenge]] in [[England]]. Located within the (southern) [[Avenue (archaeology)|Avenue]], it begins as a shallow disturbance over Stonehole B (WA 3606) increasing in depth east-northeast as it [[Scrollwork|scrolls]]-arcs to the East deeper, its final depth being unknown. This broad feature cuts perpendicular through [[Heelstone Ditch]] whose segment is missing there in its curved path towards Stonehole 96 (WA 163), the [[Heelstone]]. It is exceedingly deep (6 ft, 1.8m) where it crosses just East passed the missing segment of Heelstone Ditch (average depth: 4 ft, 1.2m). Entirely cut away is Heelstone Ditch's lower-half fill of [[Mississippian (geologic period)|Early Carboniferous]] ([[Arundian]] Age) High Tor [[Limestone]] and its upper-half fill of silted-in [[periglacial]] [[Cryoturbation|cryoturbated]] chalk. Scroll Trench's backfill soil is a mixture of both [[Lithology|lithologies]] and stone chips of all Stonehenge period varieties, indicating it postdates their occurrences. Stratigraphic sequence runs Scroll Trench - Stonehole 97 - Heelstone Ditch - (southern) Avenue Bank, from most recent to earliest. [[William Hawley|Lt-Col William Hawley]] found Scroll Trench in his "Excavations at Stonehenge during the season of 1923";

:''"I did not follow the course of it up to the Helestone, as I should like to have done, for I avoided going nearer to it than 10 ft., fearing to disturb its stability (the depth being unknown)" - "A satisfactory examination would not be possible without permission and assistance from the [[Office of Works]]."'' (page 25)

Scroll Trench, eastward from Heelstone Ditch to the Heelstone, remains unexcavated to this day. The feature was dated by Office of Works' draughtsman Robert Newall as 7th-6th century BC, with an [[electrum]] [[stater]] coin. Hawley sought permission to fully examine it satisfactorily, and he sought assistance in stabilising Heelstone while investigating it, but neither were granted.Hawley, Lt-Col W. ''Report on the Excavations at Stonehenge during the season of 1923''. The Antiquaries Journal 5, Oxford University Press, 1925, p. 25. Office of Works, now Department for Culture, Media and Sport (Secretary): Jeremy Hunt; National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty (Board of Trustees): Simon Jenkins, Sir Laurie Magnus Bt, Patrick Casement, Sir Crispin Davis, Richard Farrant, Sir Edward Greenwell, Charles Gurassa, Nichola Johnson, Sir Mark Jones, Adrian Phillips, Michael Quicke, Mary Villiers; Historic Building and Monuments Commission for England (Chair): Baroness Kay Andrews; (Commissioners): Lynda Addison, Maria Adebowale, Joyce Bridges, Manish Chande, Sir Barry Cunliffe, David Fursdon, Ronald Hutton, Jane Kennedy, John Walker, Elizabeth Williamson; (Chief Executive): Simon Thurley; (Executive Directors): Mark Pemberton, Edward Impey, Deborah Lamb, Keith Harrison; not interested in obtaining a satisfactory examination.

==Source==

* Cleal, Walker, & Montague, ''Stonehenge in its Landscape'' (London, English Heritage 1995)
* [[William Hawley|Hawley, Lt-Col W]], ''Report on the Excavations at Stonehenge during the season of 1923'' (The Antiquaries Journal 5, Oxford University Press, 1925)

==Note==
{{Reflist}}

==Further reading==
* [[Richard J. C. Atkinson|Atkinson]], R J C, ''Stonehenge'' (Penguin Books, 1956)
* Newall, R S, ''Stonehenge, Wiltshire (Ancient monuments and historic buildings)'' (Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, 1959)

[[Category:Stonehenge]]

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/ba/ba.html
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56014552
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Scroll_Trench
http://www.eternalidol.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Scroll-Trench.1.jpg

:{{la|Scroll Trench}} ([[Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Scroll Trench|View AfD]][[Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Log/2011 July 19#{{anchorencode:Scroll Trench}}|View log]])

:({{Find sources|Scroll Trench}})
I have no reason to believe this exists under this name. There may be a trench that meets some of the description (ignoring the geology) but it does not appear to be significant and certainly not discussed in reliable sources under either name. It is however widely publicised on the web by the article's creator, see for instance [www.voy.com/92635/471.html this forum post]]. I know the creator of the article (see also their last edit just before mine) well from off-Wiki as an extremely prolific poster whose edits are (trying to be polite here) basically fantasies. This [http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=User_talk:Garry_Denke&oldid=145737982 old version of his talk page] provides an example of his style. [[User:Dougweller|Dougweller]] ([[User talk:Dougweller|talk]]) 11:30, 19 July 2011 (UTC)

* Scroll (Arc) Trench of Stonehenge (UK) duly Filed and Recorded in Deed Records and Official Public Records of Archer, Baylor, Hampshire, Wiltshire, (etc) County courthouses (Just to name a few); Therefore any such re-Publication of said Scroll (Arc) Trench of Stonehenge (UK) hereinat Wikipedia not required. Thank you. Garry Denke 01:00, 20 July 2011 (UTC) Preceding [[Wikipedia:Signatures|unsigned]] comment added by [[User:Garry Denke|Garry Denke]] ([[User talk:Garry Denke|talk]] [[Special:Contributions/Garry Denke|contribs]]) Template:Unsigned --> Autosigned by SineBot-->

*'''Delete''' If it even exists, there's no way a single feature could be notable enough for its own article. '''[[User:Joey Roe|joe•roe]]''''''[[User talk:Joey Roe|t]]'''•'''[[Special:Contributions/Joey Roe|c]]''' 17:22, 20 July 2011 (UTC)

:Note: This debate has been included in the [[Wikipedia:WikiProject Deletion sorting/England|list of England-related deletion discussions]]. Template:Deletion sorting--> [[User:Gene93k| Gene93k]] ([[User talk:Gene93k|talk]]) 01:23, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

:Note: This debate has been included in the [[Wikipedia:WikiProject Deletion sorting/Science|list of Science-related deletion discussions]]. Template:Deletion sorting--> [[User:Gene93k| Gene93k]] ([[User talk:Gene93k|talk]]) 01:23, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

*Other than Doctor Garry Denke's (1622-1699) eastern 8 ft (2.4m) vertical Core-cutting of it (Scroll Trench: 1656), and Colonel William Hawley's (18511941) western 9 ft (2.7m) horizontal Cross-section of it (Scroll Trench: 1923), no other Physical evidence of it exists; Therefore the Wikipedia article unnecessary. Maps: [http://www.eternalidol.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Scroll-Trench.1.jpg] Sections: [http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56014552] Thank you. [[Special:Contributions/76.184.189.94|76.184.189.94]] ([[User talk:76.184.189.94|talk]]) 12:24, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

*'''Comment''' This is the article's creator, Garry Denke, editing logged out and evidently agreeing to the deletion. [[User:Dougweller|Dougweller]] ([[User talk:Dougweller|talk]]) 12:27, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

http://www.britarch.ac.uk/ba/ba.html
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/56014552
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Articles_for_deletion/Scroll_Trench
http://www.eternalidol.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Scroll-Trench.1.jpg

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